Keep Feet Safe and Healthy through the Cold Connecticut Winter

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Here in Hartford, we’re smack in the middle of the long, cold Connecticut winter months. That means seasonal activities and cold feet – and all the potential problems that accompany them. Here are some tips from Hartford Podiatry Group’s Dr. Eric Kosofsky and Dr. Robert Rutstein to help keep your feet and ankles safe and healthy until the spring thaw. 

  • Keep your feet warm. This is especially important for patients with diabetes, neuropathy, and other ailments that impair circulation and sensation. Wear wool socks and insulated, waterproof boots when you head out. Staying home? Don’t go barefoot. Wear a pair of slippers. If you enjoy wearing socks inside, prevent foot and ankle injuries by choosing a pair with non-slip treads to prevent falls.

  • Stay safe while shoveling. Be sure to wear shoes with deep treads. Avoid sneakers or other flimsy footwear on icy sidewalks.

  • If all that warmth means that feet sweat, be sure to dry them well and change socks when you get home. This will reduce your risk of toenail fungus and other infections.

  • Winter air is low in humidity. Dry skin and heel cracks can result. Be sure to apply moisturizer generously after showering or bathing and again before bed.

  • Hitting the slopes for skiing or snowboarding? Be sure that your footwear is properly sized and in good condition. New to the sport? Consider a professional lesson. 

Regardless of the season, the best thing you can do to ensure foot health is to visit a board-certified podiatrist like Eric Kosofsky, DPM and Robert Rutstein, DPM. With years of training and experience, these medical specialists are the best-qualified professionals to diagnose and treat all illnesses and injuries of the feet, ankles, and lower legs. Call Hartford Podiatry Group’s friendly staff at 860-523-8026 or click here to schedule a convenient appointment in our comfortable Hartford and Rocky Hill offices today.