Podiatrist Blog

By Hartford Podiatry Group
June 13, 2018
Category: foot pain
Tags: Orthotics  

Your two peroneal tendons are located on the outer side of the foot and ankle.  They begin where the peroneus brevis and peroneus longus muscles end in the lower leg and attach the muscle to the foot. The purpose of these tendons is to rotate the foot outward, acting in direct opposition to other tendons on the inner side of the foot that rotate the foot inward. This balanced function is vital to the preservation of proper posture and a gait free from discomfort. When the peroneal tendons become irritated, inflamed, or injured, peroneal tendonitis occurs.

What Causes Peroneal Tendonitis?

Your peroneal tendons can become injured due to a variety of reasons including:

  • repetitive stress injuries from stop-and-start sports or sports that involve a frequent change in direction such as basketball
  • issues caused by intense participation in dance
  • ankle sprains
  • falls

How Can I Spot Peroneal Tendonitis?

Symptoms of peroneal tendonitis can vary, but nearly always begin slowly and worsen over time. Be alert to pain on the outside of the ankle or foot. This can be an aching, sharp, or even shooting. The pain typically intensifies when the ankle is turned inward when the foot is purposely moved upward and outward, or with activity. You may notice swelling.

Can My Podiatrist Help Peroneal Tendonitis?

Yes! With years of specialized training and experience, your podiatrist is the best-qualified professional to care for any issue related to your feet, ankles, and lower legs. If your podiatrist confirms your suspicion of peroneal tendonitis, he or she will have numerous treatment options available, including:

  • over-the-counter and prescription medication for pain and inflammation
  • rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE)
  • orthotics to provide cushioning and support
  • steroid injections
  • surgery, but only in severe cases

If you are concerned about peroneal tendonitis or anything else related to the health and well-being of your feet or ankles, it’s time to schedule a visit with the podiatrist. Dr. Eric Kosofsky and Dr. Robert Rutstein are board-certified experts who can help. Call Hartford Podiatry Group at 860-523-8026 or click here to make a convenient appointment in our modern, comfortable offices in Hartford and Rocky Hill.

By Hartford Podiatry Group
June 06, 2018
Category: foot injuries

Summer has finally come to Connecticut, and Dr. Eric Kosofsky and Dr. Robert Rutstein know that many area residents will be enjoying the warm weather with outdoor activities such as biking, hiking, walking, and running. Every year, with that increase in activity, we see a spike in foot and ankle injuries. Here are five tips from Hartford Podiatry Group to help you stay safe in the coming warm weather months:

  1. Avoid going barefoot. Wear closed shoes while exercising and especially while grilling. The layer of protection offered by the uppers and soles of your shoes will help protect your feet.
  2. Remember your feet when applying sunscreen. They’re as vulnerable to sunburn and even to skin cancer as the rest of your body is.
  3. Stay present and pay attention to your surroundings. Watch where you’re going. At night, use lights to see and be seen. Make sure that your music isn’t loud enough to interfere with your ability to hear warnings. Reply to that text or return that phone call later. Tripping, falling, and other preventable accidents can cause sprains and fractures.
  4. Is poor balance an issue for you? Improve and maintain balance by adding a gentle yoga or tai chi class to your weekly exercise routine.
  5. Your diet affects your overall well-being. Preserve and improve bone health with a balanced diet rich in lean protein, colorful fruits and vegetables, and foods high in calcium and vitamin D such as dairy products, leafy green vegetables, and fish with their bones. Be careful to maintain a reasonable weight that doesn’t put extra stress on your feet and your joints.

Are you concerned that you may have recently experienced a foot or ankle injury? With decades of specialized training and experience, your podiatrist is the best-qualified medical professional to help you. Call Hartford Podiatry Group at 860-523-8026 or click here to schedule a convenient appointment with Eric Kosofsky, DPM and Robert Rutstein, DPM in our comfortable Hartford and Rocky Hill offices. Our doctors will begin with a thorough examination and careful diagnosis of your issue, then work with you to create an effective and individualized plan for treatment and aftercare.

 

By Hartford Podiatry Group
May 30, 2018
Category: Proper Footwear

You know your shoe size, right? It’s a number that refers to the length of your foot. Did you know that you also have a size that refers to the width of your foot? It’s a letter. Most people are a B, so A is considered narrow, C and D are considered wide, and E and higher are extra wide.

Some people are born with wide feet, but a wider foot is more often the result of one or more common causes, including

  • pregnancy weight gain and hormonal changes
  • years in a career that requires hours of standing, such as pharmacy or education
  • foot shape changes caused by bunions
  • obesity or excess weight
  • aging

Shoe shopping can be a source of frustration for men, women, and children with wider than average feet, but it doesn’t have to be that way.  Here are some tips from Dr. Eric Kosofsky and Dr. Robert Rutstein to help you find a comfortable pair:

  • Have your feet professionally measured at least once a year. Foot size changes over time. It’s worth a trip to the shoe store to make sure that you’re purchasing shoes in the correct size before investing in a new pair.
  • Choose shoes with wide, roomy toe boxes that allow plenty of space. Your wide feet are not very likely to be comfortable in a pointy pair of dress shoes.
  • Avoid slip-on shoes, which cannot be adjusted to your feet, and opt for a pair with laces or straps instead. This will allow you to set the width of your shoes to accommodate your feet.
  • Look for specialty stores or websites which will offer you more options than conventional outlets.
  • Talk to your podiatrist about orthotics. Slipping these custom-made appliances in your shoes can provide extra cushioning and support, leading to greater comfort.

If you’re experiencing discomfort attributable to wide feet, or if you have any other concerns about the health or well-being of your feet, ankles, or lower legs, it’s time for a visit to the podiatrist. With years of specialized training and experience, your foot doctor is the best-qualified medical professional to help you. Click here or call Hartford Podiatry Group at 860-523-8026 to schedule a convenient appointment with Eric Kosofsky, DPM and Robert Rutstein, DPM in our comfortable offices in Hartford and Rocky Hill.

By Hartford Podiatry Group
May 23, 2018
Category: Toe injury
Tags: diabetes  

Stubbing your toe seems like nothing to make much of a fuss about. A little injury, right? A momentary inconvenience. Maybe. But maybe not. Sometimes a stubbed toe leads to an injury that is more serious than it seems at first.

There are two anatomical reasons why stubbing your toe hurts so intensely. First, your feet, and especially your toes, are densely packed with nerve endings. Second, fat deposits at the front of your toe would help absorb the impact and protect you from injury, but there are few to none there and the bone is especially vulnerable to fracture.

After the initial shock and pain wear off, you should inspect a stubbed toe for signs of fracture including:

  • limited range of motion
  • a cracking sound when you move your toe
  • pain that doesn’t go away or gets worse when pressure is applied
  • bleeding under or around the toenail
  • discoloration
  • swelling

If you think that you may have fractured a toe as a result of stubbing it, you should see your foot doctor right away, especially if you are someone with impaired balance, a compromised immune system, or a circulatory ailment such as peripheral arterial disease or diabetes. With years of experience and specialized training, your podiatrist is the most qualified medical professional to help you. She or he will carefully examine your stubbed to determine if there is a fracture and, if so, will have many treatment options available including:

  • over-the-counter and prescription anti-inflammatory medications to relieve pain and swelling
  • taping, splinting or the use of a rigid boot to immobilize your toe
  • surgery to reset the bone and/or remove bone fragments, but only in the most severe cases

If you are concerned about injury caused by a stubbed toe, or anything else related to the health and well-being of your feet, ankles, or lower legs, a visit to the podiatrist is in order. Click here or call Hartford Podiatry Group at 860-523-8026 to schedule a convenient appointment with Eric Kosofsky, DPM and Robert Rutstein, DPM in our comfortable, modern Newton office. Our board-certified podiatrists will examine your feet, diagnose your issue, and work with you to create an effective and individualized plan for treatment and follow up.

By Hartford Podiatry Group
May 21, 2018
Category: circulation

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is one of the most life-threatening conditions podiatrists may diagnose and treat.

A deep vein thrombosis is a blood clot in a deep vein. DVT can occur anywhere in the body but is most typically observed in the lower legs. DVT is a serious condition and requires immediate medical attention. When a DVT dislodges, it flows freely in the body and can travel to the lungs. This causes a pulmonary embolism (PE) to occur, partially or entirely blocking blood flow to the heart and creating a potentially life-threatening situation. This happens in one out of every eight cases of DVT and has a mortality rate of 25%. It’s essential to know the signs of DVT and to seek help immediately if you suspect that you might have developed one.

Who Is at Risk of DVT?

Some people are more likely to develop DVT than others. Are you:

  • overweight or obese?
  • inactive or physically unfit?
  • a tobacco user?
  • someone who spends long periods of time sitting at work or at home?
  • a senior citizen?
  • a patient with high cholesterol levels or a history of heart disease/failure?
  • on oral contraceptives?
  • immobilized after a recent accident or surgical procedure?

Your risk increases with each “yes,” but you can lower your risk by losing weight and increasing your activity levels. Of course, for so many reasons, you should quit smoking today.

DVT Signs and Symptoms

Some people develop DVT with no symptoms at all. However, DVT typically appears with swelling, warmth, tenderness, or pain in one leg. Many patients typically say that DVT discomfort feels very sore or like a cramp in the calf that won’t go away. You may also notice pain when extending the foot.

If you suspect deep vein thrombosis, you should call your foot doctor’s office right away. With years of specialized training and experience, your podiatrist is the best-qualified professional to treat DVT. If your podiatrist confirms your suspicion, she or he will have numerous options available to resolve your DVT and prevent future problems, including medication, special socks, physical therapy, and more.

If you are concerned about DVT or any other issue related to the health and well-being of your feet, ankles, or lower legs, call Hartford Podiatry Group at 860-523-8026. You can also click here to schedule a convenient appointment with Eric Kosofsky, DPM and Robert Rutstein, DPM in our comfortable Hartford and Rocky Hill offices. Our doctors will diagnose your issue and work with you to create an individualized and effective plan for treatment and follow up.

 





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